Colors! (A plus or a minus?)


#1

We’re used to most creams, lotions, etc being white or beigish. How appealing would it be to incorporate colors into the products? I’m not talking about electric screaming planet type colors. We all know that colors heighten or lower certain moods. They could even be used to differentiate between 2 versions of a product, for instance one of the body washes. The white or beige could be a lower key version, the colored product could have an extra dose of the scent combination. What colors would work for you? Any ideas for natural coloring that would work in a cream or lotion?


Poll: Colored products to highlight ingredients?
#2

Might be a cool idea for a tinting lotion, for example one that contains henna?


#3

If if doesn’t actually improve the function of the product, what would be the purpose? And, wouldn’t it possibly increase the price to make it, resulting in a higher price to sell it?


#4

I am experimenting with herbs to create natural dyes. The only thing I would be concerned about is if it would change my skin or hair color. Chamomile lightens hair, like lemon juice. Hibiscus stains a bit red, like beets. Turmeric stains my counters so I think proper amounts are key. In most cases, I feel like color additives are just a filler in the product for eye appeal. If plants were used, maybe I’d give it a go. Something interesting about artificial food coloring:


#5

I think the color of the bottle can really impact who buys the product and what conditions the product should address. I would think that lighter blues and pinks are soothing, calming products. Red would signal more of intense product.


#6

Maybe some would find it useful but I guess I am fine with white, cream, clear, etc. I wouldn’t want color to add in anything toxic or be used as a filler.


#7

Melissa21

      CC Body Wash 01

    July 12

Maybe some would find it useful but I guess I am fine with white, cream, clear, etc. I wouldn’t want color to add in anything toxic or be used as a filler.


#8

alpacas

      CC Body Wash 01

    July 12

I am experimenting with herbs to create natural dyes. The only thing I would be concerned about is if it would change my skin or hair color. Chamomile lightens hair, like lemon juice. Hibiscus stains a bit red, like beets. Turmeric stains my counters so I think proper amounts are key. In most cases, I feel like color additives are just a filler in the product for eye appeal. If plants were used, maybe I’d give it a go. Something interesting about artificial food coloring:

Slate Magazine

Food Coloring Is Probably Bad for Us. It’s Also Unnecessary. Why Hasn’t the FDA…

In Britain, McDonald’s fries have four ingredients: potatoes, vegetable oil, dextrose, and salt. In the U.S., McDonald’s fries have a whopping 19 ingre …


#9

Freedom

      CC Body Wash 01

    July 12

If if doesn’t actually improve the function of the product, what would be the purpose? And, wouldn’t it possibly increase the price to make it, resulting in a higher price to sell it?


#10

John

    July 12

Might be a cool idea for a tinting lotion, for example one that contains henna?

en.wikipedia.org

Henna

Henna (Arabic: حِنَّاء‎) is a dye prepared from the plant Lawsonia inermis, also known as hina, the henna tree, the mignonette tree, and the Egyptian privet, the sole species of the genus Lawsonia. Henna can also refer to the temporary body art resulting from the staining of the skin from the dyes (see also mehndi). Henna has been used since antiquity to dye skin, hair and fingernails, as well as fabrics including silk, wool and leather. Historically, henna was used in the Arabian Peninsula, Ind…


#11

I’m not opposed to it but it’s not something that would interest me. Maybe because of my age or because I’m only looking for natural products. Now if a product was a certain color because of the ingredients used(maybe even beneficial) that may peak my interest.


#12

lmattox

      CC Body Wash 01

    July 12

I’m not opposed to it but it’s not something that would interest me. Maybe because of my age or because I’m only looking for natural products. Now if a product was a certain color because of the ingredients used(maybe even beneficial) that may peak my interest.


#13

Elizabeth

    July 12

I think the color of the bottle can really impact who buys the product and what conditions the product should address. I would think that lighter blues and pinks are soothing, calming products. Red would signal more of intense product.


#14

I thought about that, too. Some natural colors are beautiful, may actually contribute a healthy quality to the product, but some of them could temporarily tint skin or hair when this wasn’t wanted. Beets were what came to mind. Obviously, this is something that would have to be carefully examined.


#15

I hadn’t thought of henna, what do you think it might go into?


#16

Still getting used to the new system. It looks like we might have crossed wires somewhere.Of course we’d use a natural source, that’s a major part of the Community Cosmetics concept. I am curious as to why you thik your age might make a difference. Is it a marketing question?


#17

Actually, it might improve the product, depending on the source and concentration of the natural coloring agent.


#18

A sunless self-tanning product?


#19

I’ve always liked clear and white ones because it makes me feel better knowing there’s no artificial colors added in. I’m completely open to it if the coloring is natural though or even if it’s just a very small amount of it! I’d like muted ones though, like very pale orange, purple, etc. Like you said, electric colors would just be too much haha. But like with the body wash samples we got, I had no issue with 01b being slightly orange since it was such a toned down orange.


#20

So one aspect of this might be to naturally color enhance lotions to highlight their ingredients, for example: pink hues for rose essential oils, or purple for lavender, orange for citrus, etc. I think Bath & Body works does this.